(via parvifolium)

erikkwakkel:

Smart page with string

These pages from a late-16th-century scientific manuscript share a most unusual feature: they contain a string that runs through a pierced hole. Dozens of them are found in this book. The pages contain diagrams that accompany astronomical tracts. They show such things as the working of the astrolabe (Pic 1), the position of the stars (Pic 4), and the movement of the sun (Pic 6). The book was written and copied by the cartographer Jean du Temps of Blois (born 1555), about whom little appears to be known. The book contains a number of volvelles or wheel charts: revolving disks that the reader would turn to execute calculations. The strings seen in these images are another example of the “hands-on” kind of reading the book facilitates. Pulling the string tight and moving it from left to right, or all the way around, would connect different bits of data, like a modern computer: the string drew a temporary line between two or more values, highlighting their relationship. The tiny addition made the physical page as smart as its contents.

Pics: London, British Library, Harley MS 3263: more on this book here; and full digital reproduction here.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.

Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Humans have complicated every simple gift of the gods.

Diogenes (via varangoi)

(via uromancy)

mapsontheweb:

Illustrations of Chartography, 1852

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

(via persephon-y)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Abel Macias

I never wish to be easily defined. I’d rather float over other people’s minds as something strictly fluid and non-perceivable; more like a transparent, paradoxically iridescent creature rather than an actual person.

Franz Kafka (via blackestdespondency)

(via heavymuffintop)

gonks:

I feel everything. From the bath water that’s slightly too cold, to the pain in that old man’s eyes as he walks through the street and wonders how he came to be so alone. I think such small and intricate thoughts; untouched blades, so dangerously sharp. These thoughts cut the deepest and yet a part of me craves to swim in a river of red. I want to watch myself bleed in the comfort of knowing I’m not alone and nor are the hidden droplets of life that no one else has thought to look for. That’s why shallow people are often so beautifully pristine - they are thinkers of common thoughts: blunt knives that cut no deeper into their smooth skin than the hands that caress their bodies. 

Lonely are the sufferers.

(via demand-the-impossible)

persephon-y:

sandersonfarquhar:

aliveandfullofjoy:

Let’s just take a moment to appreciate the written score for the Chromolume music.

LOL

sandersonfarquhar thank you for helping me to discover some of the weirdest music I’ve ever heard.